5 Words for Great Beginnings

"Education Dictionary Word Knowledge Definition" by PDPics

“Education Dictionary Word Knowledge Definition” by PDPics is dedicated to the public domain under CC0.

We don’t think of fall as a time for beginnings, except perhaps as the beginning of the end. It’s a mild season set between two harsh ones, the last of which is winter: the cold, dark sleep. But this year, as summer ends and we all gear up to face another season, another semester, another year, I encourage you to think of autumn, or any season, as an opportunity for a new start. And then, while we wait for NaNoWriMo to come along, take your newfound outlook and these very fitting words and do something with them.

Foment v. to instigate.
Be just a tiny bit careful with this one. Foment is typically used to describe the advent of an evil, dangerous, or otherwise undesirable event or action.

Inchoate adj. newly begun and therefore not fully formed; also, in legal terms, a crime of planning, e.g. incitement or conspiracy.
I refer to pieces of which I have already conceived mentally but have not yet written down as “marinating.” This is a great word to use instead.

Incipient adj. just starting to develop, or (or a person) developing in a particular way.
Don’t get this one confused with “insipid.” There’s nothing inherently negative to be found here.

Nascent adj. just beginning to exist and show signs of success potential.
This one usually describes a business, organization, plan, or process. Under the last, it may distinguish a budding talent, much like “incipient.”

Neoteric n. a modern person, or one who advocates progress and novelty. adj. recent, or new.
I love the delightfully inventive feel of this one. Use it sparingly, however: it’s a $0.50 word.


Are you participating in NaNoWriMo? Have no idea what that is? Do you think I missed a fantastic beginning word? Let me know in the comments!

 

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